Albert Einstein and Autism Connection

Einstein had difficulty with social interactions, had tactile sensitivity, was very intelligent yet found his language difficult at times, and had difficulty learning in school.   It may have been that Einstein had such a hard time with learning in school because he did not have the accommodations and different teaching styles that many autistic children need.  Because of this, it makes perfect sense that someone so intelligent and full of ideas about the world could fall behind in school.  It also makes sense that, because of his social interactions with others, he found it difficult to get a job despite his intelligence.  Many of the individuals also  have a lack of desire for food and the same disregard for timeliness of meals as Einstein.  However, Einstein did not care what he ate and completed his meals with no complaints.  Many other autistics were very specific about the kinds, colors, textures, and smells of foods if they had any aversion to food at all.  His carelessness for the time or necessity of food rather than persistence on what the food he ate is slightly different than most autistics.  However, all autistics are different, and therefore it is indeterminant whether this should be classified as an autistic trait or not.  Einstein had a relationship with a woman whom he eventually married and had three children with.  The marriage seemed to have quite a bit of difficulty, but  the woman gave birth to three children with him.  However, although Einstein showed love and concern for his children, the  he could not stand for the children to touch him.  This, sounds very characteristic of an autistic.  It is important to realize that Einstein was very different and it was his difference that made him develop ideas that made him famous.  Therefore, his differences made him the celebrated individual he is today.  This should give us a second look at those who we consider different, and make us realize that being different is not a bad thing.  It is instead, something to be celebrated and accepted.

 

Source: autismmythbusters.com/general-public/famous-autistic-people